Andrew W.


Andrew W.

Tutor

San Francisco, CA 94117

Will travel 4 miles

$300 per hour.

5.0 17 ratings

Postdoctoral scholar in chemistry, happily tutoring all the sciences

Hey! I'm a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford developing new structural refinement strategies and exploring next generation methods of ribosome design. I just completed my Ph.D. at NYU, where I described new ways to inhibit protein-protein interactions. Earlier, I earned my B.A. from Harvard in Chemistry, though while I was there I spent a great deal of time on mathematics and physics as well. My undergraduate thesis was mostly in medicinal chemistry and total synthesis. I tutored through Har... [more]


Algebra 1


Algebra 2


Biology


Calculus


Chemistry


Grammar


Microsoft Excel


Geometry


Microsoft Word


Physics


Microsoft PowerPoint


Prealgebra


Precalculus


Trigonometry


Writing


Astronomy


Java


Government & Politics


HTML


Biochemistry


SAT Math


Proofreading


SAT Reading


SAT Writing


Physical Science


Microbiology


General Computer

I started to familiarize myself with computers at age seven and have explored methods for accomplishing tasks more easily and efficiently from the outset. I'm familiar with many of the challenges faced by systems that can be, at first blush, arcane and foreboding. I'm equally confident that I can help users develop the confidence necessary to use computers with great aptitude. I am proficient with both Windows (principally XP) and Linux (principally Ubuntu) but I can easily explain the mechanisms behind any operating system.


Discrete Math

I have taken two courses in discrete mathematics. The first, at Pennsylvania Governor's School for the Sciences, was problem solving-based, covering a variety of topics in combinatorics, graph theory, and number theory. The second, Mathematics 152 at Harvard, was a rigorous proof-based course that linked topics in discrete mathematics to group theory and Euclidean geometry. I've taken two other courses at the graduate level that covered a topic called "evolutionary graph theory," which applies certain elements of game theory to computational models of evolutionary dynamics, evaluated on structured populations that are described by graphs: those courses have both indirectly given me experience with other topics in discrete mathematics.


Differential Equations

At Harvard, I took a course called Applied Mathematics 105b, which covers methods for solving any linear differential equation--ordinary or partial--of any order. For example, I'm very familiar with power series methods, with transforming a differential equation of order n into a system of n first-order differential equations with easily accessible solutions, with numerical and computational methods, with families of solutions like Bessel functions, and with the most common applications of differential equations, like the diffusion equation, heat equation, wave equation, and so forth.


C++

I've been programming in C++ for around ten years. I started with simple console applications and wrote a few basic programs (text-based games, mainly) and subsequently moved to larger-scale projects (learning object-oriented methods, learning Windows/DirectX game programming, and so forth). My sophomore fall semester at Harvard, I took Computer Science 50, a rigorous introductory programming class much of which is conducted in C, a language with a close relationship to C++. (There exists no C program that is not also a C++ program.) Through that course, I gained a formal perspective on all aspects of C, giving me further insight into C++.


Computer Programming

I have ten years of programming experience in languages including BASIC, C, C++, Perl, Python, Ruby, HTML, Java, Javascript, R, Mathematica, and Lisp. I am an active developer of Rosetta, the state-of-the-art protein modeling suite, and in my graduate work I program daily.


Organic Chemistry

I first took an organic chemistry class my sophomore year of high school. I encountered the subject again the summer after my junior year, at Pennsylvania Governor's School for the Sciences. As a chemistry major, upon entering college I've encountered organic chemistry in some capacity every semester. I've also helped my peers--and two years of younger friends taking freshman orgo, by now--master this very material, and I'm currently a teaching fellow for the Harvard Summer School's organic chemistry class. From mechanism problems to retrosynthesis, from pericyclic reactions to enolate chemistry to organometallics, from carbenes to radicals: I have experience teaching organic chemistry at every level of detail.